How long before retirement to look for another job

0
0

I`ve been a government computer engineer for a long time and am starting to plan for retirement. I`ll be getting another job after retirement. How far ahead of time should I start to look for another position? How early would be too early from a private company’s perspective?

Blocked by moderator
Posted by (Questions: 1, Answers: 1)
Asked on October 31, 2017 2:45 pm
1382 views
-2
Private answer

I am sorry but your question is not something I can answer. It would depend on how much time you want between your federal and private sector job, what is the private sector’s policy, how marketable you are and many other factors, that only you would know.

Blocked by moderator
Posted by (Questions: 0, Answers: 453)
Answered on October 31, 2017 3:49 pm

I have been a federal law enforcement officer since 06/22/1992, 4 years 3 months military bought back, if I retire January 2018 what would my ex spouse be entitled to based on 21 years marriage?

( at November 5, 2017 9:00 pm)

Also the judge awarded here $1,300 a month spousal one month ago before retirement. Will that come out of the FERS or am I in for another fight.

( at November 5, 2017 9:01 pm)
2
Private answer

There are number of variables, as Elaine mentioned. And I agree that it depends on your marketability, salary requirements, etc. While you could get the first job you apply for, it is more likely that you should expect at least 3-6 or so months of regular job search and follow up. That means applying for jobs regularly, following up to determine status, networking, etc. The old “rule of thumb” of one months for each $10k in salary is still a reasonable expectation but again, it depends on the factors mentioned above, as well as whether you know someone within the company that is pulling for you. Best, Nancy

Blocked by moderator
Posted by (Questions: 0, Answers: 12)
Answered on October 31, 2017 6:45 pm

How long do you think it is appropriate for me to wait to respond to a job offer?

( at November 5, 2017 9:05 pm)
0
Private answer
Stacy: Court orders determine how much is paid to a former spouse. Without having an order, one can only guess what your former spouse will be awarded. Generally speaking, OPM will calculate your annuity at the time of your retirement in the same fashion as if you hadn’t been divorced. They will then develop a fraction that they will use to divide your annuity. The order could divide your self-only annuity or your gross annuity – all depends on the wording in the order. The numerator of the fraction is typically the number of months that you were married and a federal employee. The denominator will be your total creditable service, including military time and unused sick leave (unless the order states otherwise). Suppose your career length is determined by OPM to be 276 months and your marriage length was 156 months. The fraction is 156/276 = 56.52%. That represents the marital share of the annuity. If she was awarded 50%, then her award is 28.26%. If your annuity is $3,000 per month, she receives $847.80 per month. We made a number of assumptions here, and there are other items that might be addressed in the order, such a survivor annuity and its related cost as well as possibly using a high-3 based upon your date of separation. Orders can also state a specific treatment of military deposit service.
Blocked by moderator
Posted by (Questions: 0, Answers: 453)
Answered on November 5, 2017 9:33 pm